GR Travels

The Trikuteshwara temple

The Trikuteshwara temple is a Hindu temple dedicated to Shiva. The carved temple is in the town of Gadag, 50 km southeast of Hubli-Dharwad, in Karnataka, India. It is dedicated to Shiva and has three lingams mounted on the same stone. There is a shrine dedicated to Saraswathi in this temple and it has carved columns.This temple architecture was planned by the great architect Amara Shilpi Jakanachari. The Badami Chalukyas were exponents of early architectural achievements In Deccan. Aihole, Badami and Pattadakal were their centers of art. They were succeeded by the Rashtrakutasand the Kalyani Chalukyas. The temple has ornate pillars with intricate sculpture. The sanctum enshrines three Shivalingams. The temple has chiseled stone screens and carved figurines. There is a shrine to Saraswati within the Trikuteshwara temple complex, with exquisite stone columns. Inclined slabs that serve as balcony seats are decorated with figurative panels and are overhung by steeply angled eaves. Inside the hall, the columns have figures arranged in shallow niches. The east sanctorum has three lingas representing Brahma, Maheshwara and Vishnu; the one to the south is dedicated to the goddess Saraswati. Just by the side is another temple dedicated to three devis Saraswathi, Gayathri and Sharada. Only the statues are in a new style the temple is in old architecture. The temple dates back to the Kalyani Chalukyas who ruled this region from around 1050 to 1200 CE, during which time about 50 temples were built. Saraswathi temple has been vandalised by miscreants in the early age and hence pooja is not offered here. But the architecture is superb. A number of late Chalukya monuments (11th-12th centuries) in the city indicate its historic past. Other temples in Gadag are those dedicated to Someshwara and Veera Narayana. In the middle of the city stands the Someshvara Temple. Though abandoned and now in a dilapidated state, its intricate carvings are fairly well preserved. The doorways to the hall have densely carved figures and foliation.      Book Now



Basavanna

Basavanna was a 12thcentury Indian philosopher, statesman, Kannada poet in the Shiva-focussed Bhakti movement and a social reformer during the reign of the Kalachuri-dynasty king Bijjala I in Karnataka, India. The Basavarajadevara ragale (13 out of 25 sections are available) by the Kannada poet Harihara (c.1180) is the earliest available account on the life of the social reformer and is considered important because the author was a near contemporary of his protagonist.. A full account of Basava.Basavanna was a 12thcentury Indian philosopher, statesman, Kannada poet in the Shiva-focussed Bhakti movement and a social reformer during the reign of the Kalachuri-dynasty king Bijjala I in Karnataka, India. The Basavarajadevara ragale (13 out of 25 sections are available) by the Kannada poet Harihara (c.1180) is the earliest available account on the life of the social reformer and is considered important because the author was a near contemporary of his protagonist.. A full account of BasavaBasavanna was a 12thcentury Indian philosopher, statesman, Kannada poet in the Shiva-focussed Bhakti movement and a social reformer during the reign of the Kalachuri-dynasty king Bijjala I in Karnataka, India. The Basavarajadevara ragale (13 out of 25 sections are available) by the Kannada poet Harihara (c.1180) is the earliest available account on the life of the social reformer and is considered important because the author was a near contemporary of his protagonist.. A full account of Basava      Book Now



The Rameshvara temple

The Rameshvara temple at Koodli (also spelt Rameshwara or Ramesvara, Koodli is also spelt Kudlior and literally means confluence) in the Shimoga district of Karnataka state is a Hoysala construction of the non-ornate variety and is dated to the 12th century. Koodli is a town of great antiquity and is located about 9 km north-east of Shimoga city, the district headquarters. The town gets its name because it is situated at the confluence of the Tunga and Bhadra tributaries that form the Tungabhadra river. According to art historian Adam Hardy, the temple is a single vimana (shrine and superstructure) with an open mantapa (hall) built with Soap stone. The temple is protected as a monument of national importance by the Archaeological Survey of India. Archaeological surveys have unearthed tools and other artifacts which indicate that the region in the vicinity of Koodli (and along the nearby banks of the Tunga and Bhadra rivers) had been under habitation during the Paleolithic, the Neolithic and the Megalithicperiods. Written epigraphs such as the Malavalli pillar inscription is available from the period of the Chutu dynasty, a 2nd century AD vassal of the Shatavahana empire. They were succeeded by the Kadambas of Banavasi in the 4th century, and the Chalukyas of Badami in the 6th century. The Rashtrakutas and the Kalyani Chalukyas gained power in the region in the succeeding centuries. The Hoysala empire made their presence felt in the region from about the 11th century AD. They were followed by the 14thcentury Vijayanagara Empire. In the 16th century, the Keladi Nayaka, a Vijayanagara vassal gained independence after the fall of the empire      Book Now


GR Travels

Our Other Links



Home
About
Contact

Address


  • GR TRAVELS
       No:6/4A Kazimar street,
       Main Road,Tamilnadu,
       Madurai - 625001.

Contact


  • +91-984 351 8435 (whatsapp)
       +91-9843518435
       +91-9786885353
  • grtourtaxi@gmail.com