GR Travels

Sultan Battery

Sulthan Bathery is situated about 100 km from Kozhikode on NH212 and it was earlier known as Ganapathivattom. The place owes its new name to the erstwhile ruler of Mysore, Tipu Sultan, who during his invasion of the Malabar region dumped his ammunition and parked his artillery battering in an old Jain temple here. The place was hence known as Sulthan Bathery which is a corrupted form of Sultans battery. Tipu Sultan also built a fort here, which is in ruins now and a police station stands on the mounds of the fort now. Situated at an altitude of 1000m above sea level, Sulthan Bathery enjoys a temperate climate throughout the year. The topography interwoven with valleys, plains and mountainous terrain enchants any visitor here. Once known as a strategic location in the Malabar region, Sulthan Bathery is now the largest town in Wayanad district and is known for its tourism and commercial activities. The pre historic caves, jungle trails, sparkling streams and rivers and lush greenery of the undulating hills draw a lot of tourists to the region every year. Though tribes constitute the majority of the population, Sulthan Bathery also houses a settler population (those who migrated from various parts of Kerala). The main occupation of the people here is agriculture. The place is well connected with various places with the NH 212 Kozhikode Mysore National Highway. There is also another road that branches off from Sulthan Bathery and leads to Gudallur in Tamil Nadu. Accommodation options too are available in the town. There are various resorts and government guest houses and budget hotels in the area.      Book Now



Srimath Anantheshwar Temple

MANJESHWAR or Manjulakshetra with its Puranic background is celebrated for its Temple dedicated to Srimad Anantheshwara, that is Shri Shiva accompanied by Shesha or Anantha. Evidently, the town derives its name from the presiding Deity Srimad Anantheshwar changed into Madanantheshwar and then into Manjeshwar by efflux of time and long usage. The image of Lord Shiva is believed to be an Udbhava or Swayambhoo (Self emergent). Besides the image of Shiva, there are in the temple images of Lord Narasimha and Subramanya, the latter Deity rarely worshipped in South Canara. Originally in the Madras State but now in Kerala, Manjeshwar is situated 17 Kilometers south of Mangalore on the Cochin Mangalore section of the Southern Railway, the Temple is about a Kilometer and a half from the Railway Station, being easily accessible by metalled road. By road, it is about 23 Kilometers south of Mangalore on the National Highway 66. The nearest Airport is Mangalore. The origin of the Temple dates more than a thousand years back with many Puranic legends and anecdotes woven round it.       Book Now



kanila shree bhagavathi temple

Kanila Shree Bhagavathi Temple (Also known as Kanila Shree Bhagavithi Kshetra) is a Hindu Temple of Devi Baghavathi, located on the west side of National Highway 17, approximately 1 km (0.62 mi) north of Hosangadi Junction of Manjeshwaram of Kerala state in India.Kanila Shree Bhagavathi Kalabhavana (Kalabhavana in kannada language means Hall for Arts & Cultural activities) is located on the north side of the temple. This hall is administered by the Shree Kanila Bhagavathi Temple committee. This hall is available on request for promoting arts & cultural activities, wedding events/receptions, and other committee approved meeting or party events. The TempleKanila Sahree Bhagavathi Temple is a Hindu Temple of Devi Baghavathi, located on the west side of National Highway 17, approximately 1 kilometre north of Hosangadi Junction of Manjeshwaram of Kerala state in India. Kanila Shree Bhagavathi KalabhavanaKanila Shree Bhagavathi Kalabhavana is located on the north side of the temple. This hall is administered by the Shree Kanila Bhagavathi Temple committee.      Book Now



Jain Temple

Jainism was the first missionary religion to reach the present Kerala in BC fourth century itself (Gopalakrishnan 2009). The Pattanam excavations prove this historical fact beyond doubt now. Indian rouletted ware with the inscription “Amana” meaning Sramana or Jain/Buddhist recently recovered from Pattanam near Muziris or Kodungallur testify the presence of Jain monks even in central Kerala itself around BC fourth century. Jain texts and inscriptions also talk about the southward migration of Chandragupta Maurya under the guidance of his Jain guru Bhadrabahu following a prolonged drought in the north in BC 4th century. They settled down in Sravanabelgola (white pool of Sramanas or Jains) in present Karnataka so close to north Kerala. Jainism and its culture and architecture spread to various parts of ancient Tamil country including Chera kingdom from here (Damodaran 2002).      Book Now


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